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HOT LINENuclear Energy

Burying Radioactive Wastes in Territory of Armenian Nuclear Power Plant Jeopardizes Ararat Valley

Burying Radioactive Wastes in Territory of Armenian Nuclear Power Plant Jeopardizes Ararat Valley
13:31 April 29, 2011

EcoLur

The Armenian authorities don’t intend to change their policy in regards with nuclear energy development. As Energy and Natural Resources Minister Armen Movsisyan thinks, Armenia won’t be able to ensure its own energy security without nuclear energy. In the course of the briefing on April 25 (“Briefing” TV program in the First Public Channel) Minister replied to the question asked by public about Armenian nuclear power plant risks and mining industry.

Minister Movsisyan said the problem with wastes is solved: “We won’t be able to send by air the wastes to another country, as radioactive wastes are forbidden for air transportation. We have decided to use the methods of waste dry preservation and constructed a depository in the territory of the Armenian nuclear power plant taking into consideration international experience,” Movsisyan said.

What about water circulations, under Movsisyan, there are waterways in the distance of 100 m from the station surface in the territory of the Armenian Nuclear Power Plant, which are protected from exposure. The problem of water cooling system is solved, and water cooling occurs in a mandatory manner not only with the help of pumps, but also that of gravity.

In his interview with EcoLur Ruben Yadoyan commented Minister’s words in this way:

“Underground waters run under the territory of the Armenian Nuclear Power Plant and flow into Ararat Valley over the fracture. This drinking water is of high quality. As a result of snow melting their level increases, then lowers down. When their level is high, radioactive pollution risks also get high.”

 In the cooling system water passes through the pipeline via the reactor, then goes down to the pool. If there will be any breakdown, water will got to Ararat Valley. When EcoLur asked whether 30 tons of radioactive wastes per year are many or few for such a country as Armenia, Yadoyan said, “Even 1 kg of wastes are much for us, not to speak about 30 or 40 tons per year. Certainly they are mandatory measures. We propose to use Jajur coal mine for wastes. I think there are fewer risks for wastes burial than in the territory of the Armenian nuclear power plant. But this proposal was left on the paper.”



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